1936 Philadelphia Inquirer Supplements
8 known.  Dated Sep. 13 - Nov. 1, 1936.  Measure 10" x 14-1/2"

Huge, blue-toned dated supplements to the Philadelphia Inquirer, perhaps these were an answer to the more common supplements issued by the Philadelphia Record during the same period?  Each Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement measures a full 10" wide by slightly over 14-1/2" long, features a blue-toned image of the movie star with a band of text at the bottom.  The paper stock is about the same as newsprint, the batch I acquired were all folded in half which is perhaps how they were inserted into the Sunday papers.  All of the Philadelphia Inquirer Supplements that I picked up were in strong condition with very little in the way of age toning but their size and fragile nature does make tears into the edge somewhat common.  Following are images of the eight that I've seen, arranged top to bottom by date of issue.

September 13, 1936 -- Norma Shearer
1936 Norma Shearer Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: Miss Shearer, who is known as one of the most beautiful and best-dressed women on the screen, is shown here as she appears in a scene from the talkie production of Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet."  Leslie Howard plays Romeo to her Juliet.  Norma Shearer was born in Montreal, Quebec.  Her beauty and ability won her screen recognition at an early age.  Since 1920 she has had a great number of successful roles to her credit.  In real life she is the wife of Irving Thalberg, producer.

September 20, 1936 -- Myrna Loy
1936 Myrna Loy Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: Miss Loy, one of the most versatile actresses in motion pictures, was born at Helena, Montana.  Her hobbies are sculpturing and dancing.  After some experience on the stage, she entered pictures in 1925 and then followed a series of successful roles, remarkable for variety.  She was selected by Billie Burke personally to play the part of "Billie Burke," wife of the late Flo Ziegfeld, in the spectacular musical screen production entitled "The Great Ziegfeld."

September 27, 1936 -- Loretta Young
1936 Loretta Young Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: Miss Young, whose birthplace is Salt Lake City, Utah, fell into a screen career by accident.  She answered a call from a film director which was meant for her sister Polly Ann, who was out of town.  She was accepted and given a small role in "Naughty But Nice."  Of course, all she needed was a trial.  Success came quickly after that.  Some of her latest pictures are "Shanhai," "The Unguarded Hour," "Private Number," "Ramona."  She makes hobbies of dancing and flying.

October 4, 1936 -- Shirley Temple
1936 Shirley Temple Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: You do not have to go far back to find this young screen star's birth year.  She was born in 1929 at Santa Monica, California.  In 1933 she had already made a place for herself in Hollywood's screen firmament.  Some of the pictures in which Shirley has appeared are "Baby Takes a Bow," "Bright Eyes," "Change of Heart," "Captain January," "Poor Little Rich Girl."  We don't know how far Shirley is going, but she certainly has made an early start.

October 11, 1936 -- Ginger Rogers
1936 Ginger Rogers Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: Although Miss Rogers reached the apex of her popularity in co-starring with Fred Astaire, it must be remembered that she is also a star in her own right.  Her beauty and charm are more apparent than ever in "Swing Time," the latest team picture.  It is understood, however, that Ginger will have a solo stellar role in two vehicles before she makes her next film with Astaire.  The first of these is "Mother Carey's Chickens."  This autographed portrait shows the vivacious star in a quiet mood.

October 18, 1936 -- Fred Astaire
1936 Fred Astaire Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: Although filmland producers gnash their teeth and hunt in every walk of life for "another Astaire," there is still only one Fred Astaire.  He is at present co-starring with Ginger Rogers in musical "Swing Time."  The inimitable Fred, who was born in Omaha, Nebraska, co-starred with his sister Adele on the stage before succumbing to the lure of the musical screen.  His picture career began in 1933, and his path in films has been lauren-strewn from the beginning.

October 25, 1936 -- Barbara Stanwyck
1936 Barbara Stanwyck Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: Miss Stanwyck will now be able to commercialize on her Irish extraction, as she has been given the leading role in Sean O'Casey's "The Plough and the Stars."  Barbara Stanwyck's long list of successful screen portrayals guarantees the success of the production.  She was born in Brooklyn, New York.  She is five feet and five inches high, weighs 120 pounds, and has auburn hair and blue eyes.  Her screen career began in 1929 with "The Locked Door."

November 1, 1936 -- Simone Simon
1936 Simone Simon Philadelphia Inquirer Supplement

Text at the bottom reads as follows: Miss Simon was only recently imported from France, but she has lost no time in winning the hearts of a wide circle of American screen enthusiasts.  The brunette charm of Simone Simon was first seen here in "Girls' Dormitory."  Her next appearance will be in "Ladies in Love," which is expected to be an even better vehicle for her personality.


 

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